Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about malaria and its control in rural Northwest Tanzania

Mazigo, Humphrey D., Obasy, Emmanuel, Mauka, Wilhellmus, Manyiri, Paulina, Zinga, Maria, Kweka, Eliningaya J., Mnyone, Ladslaus L., and Heukelbach, Jorg (2010) Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about malaria and its control in rural Northwest Tanzania. Malara Research and Treatment, 2010. pp. 1-9.

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Abstract

Background. We assessed community knowledge, attitudes, and practices on malaria as well as acceptability to indoor residual spraying.

Material and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was done in a community in Geita district (northwest Tanzania). Household heads (n=366) were interviewed.

Results. Knowledge on malaria transmission, prevention, and treatment was reasonable; 56% of respondents associated the disease with mosquito bites, with a significant difference between education level and knowledge on transmission (P<.001). Knowledge of mosquito breeding areas was also associated with education (illiterate: 22%; literate: 59% (P<.001). Bed nets were used by 236 (64.5%), and usage was significantly associated with education level (P<.01). The level of bed net ownership was 77.3%. Most respondents (86.3%) agreed with indoor residual spraying of insecticides. Health facilities were the first option for malaria treatment by 47.3%. Artemether-lumefantrine was the most common antimalarial therapy used.

Conclusions. Despite reasonable knowledge on malaria and its preventive measures, there is a need to improve availability of information through proper community channels. Special attention should be given to illiterate community members. High acceptance of indoor residual spraying and high level of bed net ownership should be taken as an advantage to improve malaria control.

Item ID: 16973
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: malaria, Tanzania, attitudes, knowledge, practices
ISSN: 2044-4362
Date Deposited: 13 May 2011 07:05
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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