Connectivity and the development of population genetic structure in Indo-West Pacific coral reef communities

Kool, Johnathan T., Paris, Claire B., Barber, Paul H., and Cowen, Robert K. (2011) Connectivity and the development of population genetic structure in Indo-West Pacific coral reef communities. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 20 (5). pp. 695-706.

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Abstract

Aim: To identify connectivity patterns among coral reefs of the Indo-West Pacific. Projecting connectivity forward in time provides a framework for studying long-term source–sink dynamics in the region, and makes it possible to evaluate the manner in which migration shapes population genetic structure at regional scales. This information is essential for addressing critical gaps in knowledge for conservation planning efforts in one of the most biologically diverse regions on earth.

Location: Coral reefs of the Indo-West Pacific, ranging from 15° S to 30° N and 95° E to 140° E.

Methods: Individual-based biophysical dispersal models were used in conjunction with matrix projection to identify the expected patterns of exchange between coral reefs over time.

Results: Present-day oceanographic conditions lead to the transport of larvae from the South China Sea into the Coral Triangle region via the Sulu Sea, and from northern Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands via Halmahera. The directionality of the system leads to the expected accumulation of organisms from outlying areas into the Coral Triangle region over time, particularly in the vicinity of the Maluku Islands and eastern Sulawesi. Coral reefs in Papua New Guinea, the Sulu Archipelago and areas within the Philippines are expected to be areas of high diversity as well.

Main conclusions: Biophysical dispersal models, used in conjunction with matrix projection, provide an effective means of simulating connectivity structure across the Indo-West Pacific and thereby evaluating the directionality of genetic diversity. Migration appears to have a significant influence on population genetic structure in the region. Based on present-day ocean currents, coral reefs in the South China Sea, northern Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands are contributing to high levels of diversity in the Coral Triangle.

Item ID: 16505
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: biodiversity; biogeography; connectivity; coral reefs; Coral Triangle; individual-based modelling; Indo-West Pacific; population genetic structure
ISSN: 1466-8238
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2011 03:50
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0604 Genetics > 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics @ 33%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050104 Landscape Ecology @ 33%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060207 Population Ecology @ 34%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 34%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 33%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960506 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Fresh, Ground and Surface Water Environments @ 33%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 18
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