The North Queensland "sun-safe clothing" study: design and baseline results of a randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of sun-protective clothing in preventing melanocytic nevi

Harrison, Simone L., Buettner, Petra G., and MacLennan, Robert (2005) The North Queensland "sun-safe clothing" study: design and baseline results of a randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of sun-protective clothing in preventing melanocytic nevi. American Journal of Epidemiology, 161 (6). pp. 536-545.

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Abstract

In 1999, we the authors began recruitment for a randomized controlled intervention trial aimed at preventing melanocytic nevi (moles) by minimizing sun exposure through the use of sun-protective clothing. The study involves 652 Caucasian children (75.6% response) aged 0-35 months from 25 childcare child-care centers (n=13 (n = 13 intervention and n=12 control centers) n = 12 control) living in the high solar irradiance high-solar-irradiance environment of Townsville, Queensland, Australia. Children attending intervention centers wear investigator-provided garments provided by the investigators, made from fabrics with ultraviolet protection factors rated very good to excellent ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) ratings, while control excellent. Control centers continue to offer usual care. Three-year follow-up of all children will be completed in 2005. The main outcome measure is the number of new melanocytic nevi. At baseline, the two groups were similar with respect to nevi, phenotype, age, demographic characteristics, sun-protection habits habits, and history of sun exposure, except that more control children than from control versus intervention children centers (2% and 0%, respectively; p = 0.006) had experienced painful sunburn with blistering. Higher MN melanocytic nevusnevi counts were associated with more time spent outdoors and a history of sunburn, while sunscreen use, particularly during the mild winter months, appeared to have a protective effect. These findings further substantiate the hypothesis that nevus development in young children is related to sun exposure.

Item ID: 1638
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: naevus, nevi, naevi, clothing, sun-protection, UVR, solar, ultraviolet, child, childcare, daycare, melanoma, skin, sun, exposure, health behavior, intervention studies, neoplasms
ISSN: 1476-6256
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2007
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111706 Epidemiology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920412 Preventive Medicine @ 51%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920117 Skin and Related Disorders @ 49%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 27
Downloads: Total: 2
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