Phylogeny of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus

Pollock, F. Joseph, Wilson, Bryan, Johnson, Wesley R., Morris, Pamela J., Willis, Bette L., and Bourne, David G. (2010) Phylogeny of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 2 (1). pp. 172-178.

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Abstract

A phenotypic and phylogenetic comparison of geographically disparate isolates of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus was conducted to determine whether the bacterium exists as a single cosmopolitan clonal population, which might indicate rapid spread of a pandemic strain, or is grouped into endemic and genotypically distinct strains. All strains included in this study displayed similar phenotypic characteristics to those of the typed V. coralliilyticus strain LMG 20984T. Five phylogenetic marker genes (16S, rpoA, recA, pyrH and dnaJ) frequently used for discriminating closely related Vibrio species and a zinc-metalloprotease gene (vcpA) linked to pathogenicity were sequenced in 13 V. coralliilyticus isolates collected from corals, bivalves, and their surrounding seawater in the Red and Caribbean Seas, and Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. A high level of genetic polymorphism was observed with all isolates possessing unique genotypes at all six genetic loci examined. No consistent lineage structure was observed within the marker genes and homologous recombination was detected in the 16S and vcpA genes, suggesting that V. coralliilyticus does not possess a highly clonal population structure. Interestingly, two geographically distinct (Caribbean/south-Atlantic and Indo-Pacific/north-Atlantic) and highly divergent clades were detected within the zinc-metalloprotease gene, but it is not known if these clades correspond to phenotypic differences in virulence. These findings stress the need for a multi-locus approach for inferring V. coralliilyticus phylogeny and indicate that populations of this bacterium are likely an endemic component of coral reef ecosystems globally.

Item ID: 15571
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
ISSN: 1758-2229
Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2011 04:48
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences @ 50%
96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960407 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Marine Environments @ 50%
Citation Count from Web of Science Web of Science 9
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