Criminology, criminal justice and Indigenous people: a dysfunctional relationship?

Cunneen, Chris (2009) Criminology, criminal justice and Indigenous people: a dysfunctional relationship? Current Issues in Criminal Justice, 20 (3). pp. 323-336.

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Abstract

This lecture looks at issues of crime and violence in Indigenous communities in the context of broader problems of criminal justice law, policy and practice. In particular it addresses four points:

• the problem the legal system has in ensuring protection of Indigenous women in the context of domestic and family violence;

• the problem Indigenous people have in using the legal system to protect and enhance their own interests and rights, particularly in the area of civil and family law, and the implications this has for criminalisation;

• Indigenous access to legal advice and representation and funding issues associated with Aboriginal legal services; and

• the limitations of criminal justice agencies in developing strategic policies that change the way they do business with Indigenous people.

Item ID: 15483
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
ISSN: 1034-5329
Date Deposited: 06 Jul 2011 05:19
FoR Codes: 18 LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES > 1801 Law > 180104 Civil Law and Procedure @ 30%
18 LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES > 1801 Law > 180113 Family Law @ 40%
18 LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES > 1801 Law > 180102 Access to Justice @ 30%
SEO Codes: 94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9404 Justice and the Law > 940401 Civil Justice @ 50%
94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9404 Justice and the Law > 940403 Criminal Justice @ 50%
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