Support vs. solidarity: white involvement in the Aboriginal movement

Petray, Theresa L. (2010) Support vs. solidarity: white involvement in the Aboriginal movement. Social Alternatives, 29 (3). pp. 69-72.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Abstract

The Aboriginal movement has been one of the most outspoken Australian social movements for nearly a century despite the small Aboriginal population, due partially to the support of many non-Indigenous Australians. This relationship has not always been an easy one, and Aboriginal activists have alternated between welcoming diversity and preferring a more closed movement. This paper looks at the involvement of non-Indigenous people in one Aboriginal movement organisation, the Townsville Indigenous Human Rights Group. The non-Indigenous members of the group were carefully selected by Indigenous activists who have had previous negative experiences with white supporters. All group members were acutely aware of the potential for reproducing colonial power relations, and so the white women in the group made conscious efforts to remain in the background. This strategy allowed for Aboriginal leadership; however it came at the expense of real solidarity and engagement between white and Aboriginal group members.

Item ID: 15403
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Related URLs:
ISSN: 0155-0306
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2011 00:44
FoR Codes: 16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1601 Anthropology > 160199 Anthropology not elsewhere classified @ 40%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1608 Sociology > 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified @ 40%
16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1608 Sociology > 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations @ 20%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 4
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page