Sudden infant death syndrome risk factors in North Queensland: a survey of infant care practices in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women

Panaretto, K.S., Smallwood, V.E., Cole, P., Elston, J., and Whitehall, J.S. (2002) Sudden infant death syndrome risk factors in North Queensland: a survey of infant care practices in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 38 (2). pp. 129-134.

[img] PDF (Published Version)
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1440-1754.20...

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk factors in the Indigenous and non-Indigenous community of Townsville, a large remote urban centre in north Queensland, Australia.

METHODS: Thirty Indigenous and 30 non-Indigenous women with young children were surveyed using sections of the West Australian Infancy and Pregnancy Survey 1997-1998. The prevalence of SIDS risk factors was compared between the two groups and medians and univariate associations were generated where appropriate.

RESULTS: The Indigenous women were significantly younger and more likely to be single. The median age of the infants was 8 months (range 0.3-26 months) with no difference between the two groups. Thirty-seven per cent of Indigenous infants slept prone (cf. 17% of non-Indigenous infants; P = 0.03), and 77% shared a bed (cf. 13% of non-Indigenous infants; P < 0.001). The Indigenous households had significantly more members, with 57% including extended family members (cf. 20% non-Indigenous group; P = 0.003). Fifty-three per cent of the Indigenous women smoked during pregnancy (cf. 23% of non-Indigenous women; P = 0.017), 60% were smokers at the time of the interview, and smoking occurred inside 40% of Indigenous houses (cf. 20% and 20% for non-Indigenous women, respectively; P < 0.001, 0.09).

CONCLUSION: This small survey suggests that the prevalence of SIDS risk factors is higher in the Indigenous population, and a new approach to education is needed urgently to promote SIDS awareness among Indigenous women.

Item ID: 13589
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: Indigenous health; non-Indigenous health; sudden infant death syndrome
ISSN: 1440-1754
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2010 01:26
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page