Terrigenous sediment on Ceara Rise: a Cenozoic record of South American orogeny and erosion

Dobson, David M., Dickens, Gerald R., and Rea, David K. (2001) Terrigenous sediment on Ceara Rise: a Cenozoic record of South American orogeny and erosion. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 165 (3-4). pp. 215-229.

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Abstract

Ceara Rise, located east the Amazon River mouth, is covered with a thick blanket of pelagic carbonate and hemipelagic terrigenous sediment. The terrigenous component has been extracted from 57 bulk sediment samples at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 925 and 929 on Ceara Rise to obtain a Cenozoic record of riverine discharge from northern South America. From the early Eocene to early Miocene (55–20 Ma), terrigenous accumulation was dominated by moderate amounts of generally large-grained, gray to green sediment especially depleted in elements that are enriched in post-Archaean shale (e.g. Cs, Th, Yb). However, pulsed inputs of relatively small-grained, gray to green terrigenous sediment less depleted in the above elements occurred in the late Eocene and Oligocene. The accumulation of terrigenous sediment decreased significantly until 16.5 Ma. In the middle Miocene (16.5–13 Ma), terrigenous accumulation was dominated by small amounts of small-grained, tan sediment notably depleted in Na and heavy rare earth elements. The accumulation rate of terrigenous sediment increased markedly from the latest Miocene (10 Ma) to the present day, a change characterized by deposition of gray–green sediment enriched in elements that are enriched in post-Archaean shale. Observed changes in terrigenous sediment at Ceara Rise record tectonism and erosion in northern South America. The Brazil and Guyana shields supplied sediment to the eastern South American margin until the middle Miocene (20–16.5 Ma) when a period of thrusting, shortening and uplift changed the source region, probably first to highly weathered and proximal Phanerozoic sediments. By the late Miocene (9 Ma), there was a transcontinental connection between the Andes and eastern South America. Weathering products derived from the Andes have increasingly dominated terrigenous deposition at Ceara Rise since the Late Miocene and especially since the late Pliocene.

Item ID: 13368
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: Amazon; geochemistry; grain size; riverine discharge; sediment accumulation; tectonic history
ISSN: 1872-616X
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2010 06:53
FoR Codes: 04 EARTH SCIENCES > 0403 Geology > 040313 Tectonics @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences @ 100%
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