Global research priorities for sea turtles: informing management and conservation in the 21st century

Hamann, M., Godfrey, M.H., Seminoff, J.A., Arthur, K., Barata, P.C.R., Bjorndal, K.A., Bolten, A.B., Broderick, A.C., Campbell, L.M., Carreras, C., Casale, P., Chaloupka, M., Chan, S.K.F, Coyne, M.S., Crowder, L.B., Diez, C.E., Dutton, P.H., Epperly, S.P., FitzSimmons, N.N., Formia, A., Girondot, M., Hays, G.C., Cheng, I.J., Kaska, Y., Lewison, R., Mortimer, J.A., Nichols, W.J., Reina, R.D., Shanker, K., Spotila, J.R., Tomás, J., Wallace, B.P., Work, T.M., Zbinden, J., and Godley, B.J. (2010) Global research priorities for sea turtles: informing management and conservation in the 21st century. Endangered Species Research, 11 (3). pp. 245-269.

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View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/esr00279

Abstract

Over the past 3 decades, the status of sea turtles and the need for their protection to aid population recovery have increasingly captured the interest of government agencies, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the general public worldwide. This interest has been matched by increased research attention, focusing on a wide variety of topics relating to sea turtle biology and ecology, together with the interrelations of sea turtles with the physical and natural environments. Although sea turtles have been better studied than most other marine fauna, management actions and their evaluation are often hindered by the lack of data on turtle biology, human–turtle interactions, turtle population status and threats. In an effort to inform effective sea turtle conservation a list of priority research questions was assembled based on the opinions of 35 sea turtle researchers from 13 nations working in fields related to turtle biology and/or conservation. The combined experience of the contributing researchers spanned the globe as well as many relevant disciplines involved in conservation research. An initial list of more than 200 questions gathered from respondents was condensed into 20 metaquestions and classified under 5 categories: reproductive biology, biogeography, population ecology, threats and conservation strategies.

Item ID: 12174
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: adaptive capacity, climate change, exposure, great barrier reef, marine mega-fauna, sea turtles, sensitivity, vulnerability assessment
ISSN: 1613-4796
Date Deposited: 02 Nov 2010 04:40
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 75%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology) @ 25%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 100%
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