Acute exercise in Vietnam Veterans is associated with positive subjective experiences

Sealey, Rebecca M. (2010) Acute exercise in Vietnam Veterans is associated with positive subjective experiences. International Journal of Exercise Science, 3 (1). pp. 36-42.

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Abstract

A person’s subjective experience to their first exercise session is likely to influence their long-term adherence to regular exercise. The aim of the current pilot study therefore is to quantify the subjective exercise experience of previously sedentary Vietnam War Veterans undertaking an initial bout of one of three different exercise interventions. Thirty-two Vietnam Veterans presenting with one or more chronic diseases/conditions participated in one of three acute exercise bouts: 1) lower-body vibration, upper-body resistance and stretching (WBVT); 2) lower-body vibration, upper-body resistance, aerobic exercise and stretching (WBVT+CV); and 3) full-body resistance, aerobic exercise and stretching (R+CV). Pre and post acute exercise measures of positive well being, psychological distress and fatigue were assessed with the Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale (SEES). A 3(conditions) x 2(time) repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey HSD was used to identify any significant differences in SEES between exercise groups and pre and post-exercise. All interventions increased positive well being, with WBVT and R+CV reporting improvements across all areas of the SEES. The WBVT+CV group reported slightly increased psychological distress and the greatest increase in fatigue. An acute bout of exercise increases positive well-being in previously sedentary War Veterans however a longer-duration exercise bout containing multiple exercise modes may be too demanding for this population. Exercise professionals should consider commencing with a simple program to minimise psychological distress and fatigue as this may negatively impact on exercise adherence.

Item ID: 12068
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: ex-servicemen, fatigue, training, elderly
ISSN: 1939-795X
Funders: Australian Association for Exercise and Sport Science, HyperVibe
Date Deposited: 14 Oct 2010 04:11
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology @ 30%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified @ 70%
SEO Codes: 81 DEFENCE > 810102 Army @ 20%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being) @ 40%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920502 Health Related to Ageing @ 40%
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